Rooney Points Out The Biggest Difference Between Mourinho And Solskjaer

REUTERS/Rebecca Naden

The reign of Jose Mourinho at Manchester United has officially ended. Caretaker manager and club legend Ole Gunnar Solskjaer posted a decisive showing in his first outing as a gaffer, with United winning 5-1 against Cardiff City, while also displaying a masterclass in attacking football.

The game must have certainly been a refreshing one for supporters to witness, particularly after two and a half years of Mourinho’s defensive brand.

While the latter was effective in certain scenarios, bagging them the Europa League in his first campaign and a second-spot Premier League finish in his second, the style simply wasn’t one that has been long imbibed within the DNA of the club.

In Wales, supporters finally got to witness a performance that was reminiscent of the fast-paced showing that was a regular sight during the days of Sir Alex Ferguson, back when the Red Devils were feared for their offensive tactics.

RELATED:

Wayne Rooney’s Reaction On Anthony Martial’s Stunning Goal

Now, another club legend has had his say on what was starkly different in the management of Mourinho and Solskjaer.

Speaking to BT Sport, Wayne Rooney stated the following about the disparity between the styles of the two men: “I think the difference with Mourinho is that he gets one goal up and he likes to hold onto the result, [but] now they’re trying to go up [and score more].”

RELATED:

Cardiff City 1-5 Manchester United: 5 Things We Learned

Rooney managed to highlight the precise plight that United were suffering from all these seasons.

Of course, Mourinho’s philosophy that all that matters in a football game is for a side to score one goal more than the opponents can’t be ridiculed either, particularly since it was used to outstanding success during his tenures at Inter and Chelsea.

However, that system could have never worked at Old Trafford, and the sheer ease with which the lads played the attacking style on Saturday is a testament to that.